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Solar Eclipse 2017 Near Me: City List & Zip Codes Search

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A great solar eclipse will move across the United States today. And you might just be wondering if this phenomenon will be coming a town near you. Will your community stand beneath the shadow of a total eclipse? Or will you watch from afar like the guy from New York writing this article?

Some areas won’t receive a total eclipse. Others will only be treated to a partial showing. Want to know how much you’ll see?

Time To Search!

The Courier Journal newspaper has provided a great service to their readers. This publication has formulated an easy-to-use interaction map, which provides a search bar that allows you to look up where the eclipse will hit based upon your zip code and city name. Access this info by clicking here.

A complete total eclipse won’t be hitting most states. Many will receive less than 100 percent of the eclipse.

TimeandDate.com also offers a zip code search. You’ll need to click to this site and plug in your zip code or city info. This will give you detailed info on where and how much of the eclipse will hit.

The previously mentioned web site also has the Eclipse Map, which allows you to get even more detailed info regarding the eclipse. “You can select any location to see when the eclipse starts and ends, and how much of the Sun is obscured there.”

For instance, when I typed “Kansas City” into the search engine of the eclipse map, I found out some pretty key info. In Kansas City, the total solar eclipse will be visible (100% coverage of Sun). Magnitude is 1.0006. Duration of the eclipse is 2 hours, 54 minutes and 41 seconds. Duration of totality: 42 seconds.

But that’s not all!

According to Space.com, “The total solar eclipse will cross from Oregon to South Carolina along a 70-mile-wide (110 kilometer) “path of totality.” In North America, people outside of the path of totality will see a partial solar eclipse. Totality will last, at most, about 2 minutes and 40 seconds at the center of the path, so bad weather could potentially block the main event.”





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